RETURN TO HISTORY.

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For the 1st time in a few days, we had some nice sunny weather, so I grabbed my camera gear and headed down to a favorite place in the city of Philadelphia that I like to go to.  Independence Park, the Birthplace of our Nation, has so very much to offer and see.  You can spend a whole day here going in and out of all the Historic buildings that have been preserved by the National Park Service.

This is Congress Hall.  Located in Independence Park on 6th & Market St. it served as the Seat of the US Congress from December 6th, 1790 to May 14th, 1800.  It ratified the Bill of Rights and the US Constitution in 1793.  It also oversaw the Inaugurations of our 1st President, George Washington and our 2nd President, John Adams.

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Inside Congress Hall on the 2nd Floor is where most of our Nation’s business was taken care of.  Brought back to its original look by the National Park Service, this is what it looked like in its day.  Of course, there were no electric lights at the time.  Everything was done by candle light & day light.  The carpet is not an original.  It is a reproduction of what it was.

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During my “walk about” in the Park, I came across this fella dressed in the ware of Colonial Days, playing a Mountain Dulcimer, that I have heard before.  The Mountain Dulcimer has a very soothing, interesting sound to it.  Almost sounding like a Harp, but really isn’t.  This man could play it very well.  He made it look so easy to do.  The music that came out of this instrument was so pleasant to listen to.  I watched & listened to him play for about 15 min.  Then asked him if I could take his Image.  I thanked him and moved on.

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This is just a part of Independence Park.  Here you’re looking down the open area with the Visitor Center on the right and Independence Hall in the center.  The Visitor Center is where the original Liberty Bell is located, but I didn’t go in there.  Just too many people!

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Located right next to Independence Hall is the Congress Library that is now a gift store.

I enjoyed my 2nd visit here.  There is much to see.  Lot’s of walking.  In fact, I walked around so much that my legs started getting sore & stiff.  I then returned to my car for the return drive home.

Thank you.

ON THE TRAIL OF HISTORY

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Located in Lebanon County, the Cornwall Iron Furnace was built in 1742 and stayed in operation until 1883.  Now a museum for everyone to Tour and see how Iron was made long ago.

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Called a Abattoir, this Gothic Revival structure served as a smoke house and butcher shop for the Cornwall Iron Estate.

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This was the Iron Masters home.  Now used as apartments.

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In 1875 this was the Paymasters Office for the Iron Furnace.  Now used as a Art Studio.

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The Manager’s Office & Home.  The Furnace Manager was ranked 2nd in command to the Owner.  After 1916, Bethlehem Steel also used this building as it’s Cornwall Office.

Thank you.

THEN & NOW

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Hello there, my followers.  In relation to my last Post on Port Clinton Ave. I had stated that I’d go back up there and try to shoot a Image like the one above on how it looks today.  Well, I did do just that, but found that this Image would have been impossible to re-shoot.  The place where this was taken is so very over-grown with trees that their was no way to get it.  So, I did the next best thing.  The Images below are from where the Red Dot’s are placed.  It is way different than 200 yrs. ago.

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This is what the TowPath looks like today, with the old Canal off to the left and the River to the right.

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Looking into the old Lock #30.  Summer is a bad time to see what remains, because it get’s so over-grown.  Winter time is better.

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This is the modern day Image of Port Clinton Ave.  The Lock & Canal are off to the left.  The road is almost the same as it was.  Just macadam, now, and not a dirt road.

As always,

Thank you.

OLD PORT CLINTON AVE.

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This is a very old Image of Port Clinton Ave. that was taken sometime in the early 1900’s.  It shows the old Union Canal while it was still in operation.  Most of this is all gone to History, but there is still some of it that remains today.

I have taken the time to “outline” in colors what is still visible today.  In the Black is Port Clinton Ave.  It still follows the same as it did back then.  The Brown is the old Union Canal Towpath that is now a walking trail.  The Brown square around a building is now a private residence, but still exists.  The 2 Blue Dot’s are where Historic Plaques are located along side the road to show what used to be here.  The Lock #30 is gone, as well as the 2 large Barges that sit in the Canal.

All of the other buildings shown here are long gone.  The Canal is quite over grown, which I have shown Image’s of in previous Posts.  What I’ll try to do later on is go up and see if I can find the hill that this Image was taken from.  Then compare.

As always,

Thank you.

INFRARED PARK

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Taken in IR at the Heritage Center.  Sorry for the Lens Flair.  Just did not see it until I was processing the Image.

Since I don’t have a camera that is converted to IR I use a Hoya R72 720nm screw on filter.  Take the Image and convert it to B&W.  I then have to change the sky to color as best I can.  Seems to work, but not as good as a converted camera.

As always,

Thank You.

CLASSIC CAR

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Happen to stop by a business yesterday and could not help to notice this fully restored Cadillac.  I’m not quite sure what year this is.  Maybe a 1969 or earlier model.  It was a real beauty to see.

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I’m guessing this is a Cadillac Seville, but just don’t know.  Cars like this will never be built again, like these.  Today’s cars have too much plastic.  Cheaper to make, but will never last as long as cars from the 60’s.  I remember cars like these.  Takes me back in time to when Life was so much more simple.

Thank you, as always.

Les

HISTORIC WAGON

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This past Sunday, I made another trip back up to Hamburg to see if the Historical Society was open this time.  Before I had stopped by and it was closed, but it stated that it was open every Sunday from 1 – 4 pm.  Why no one was there, I didn’t know at the time.

So, this time it was open, which made me happy.  Didn’t want to go there again and find it closed.  Grabbing my camera I went inside and was very cheerfully greeted by 2 people.  Found out they were the owners of the Society.  Very nice people to talk with.  I had told them about my younger day’s growing up in Hamburg and what I had remembered from long ago.  I also mentioned to them that most of my Family was from Hamburg and they all served in the Armed Forces during WWII.  The conversation then went on to all the places I knew but were not there anymore.  The old Union Canal, Berkey Underwear, Haun Motors, etc.  They stated to me that they had a old original “Husker Wagon” that was housed in a separate building.  Humm  .  .  .  that’s interesting.  I asked if I could see it.  My wish was granted.

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With my camera in tow, I was led into a very small building.  There in front of me was what I saw with the camera.  This old “Huskster Wagon” dates back to around 1903, when it was pulled along in the streets of Hamburg selling produce of all kinds.  This was long before refrigeration and ways of keeping food cold.  Pulled along by 2 Horses, the Huskster would travel the streets all day long until most of his merchandise was sold.

The paint has faded over time and the wooden wheels are in need of repair.  Notice the long handle brake to keep the wagon from drifting.  The Historical Society would like to restore this Historic piece of History, but money is hard to come by since most of it comes from donations.

It would be nice to once again see History in the streets again from long ago.

Thank You.