OLD HOME

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This old looking Home was noticed while walking the street of Pottsville, PA.  It happens to catch my eye because it sat up so high from the street level.  It looked like no one has been in there for awhile, but I don’t know for sure.  Notice the Iron Stairs that have to be climbed to get to it.  The Iron Stairs also lead to another level of Pottsville.  Also, notice the Black Cat that is sitting right next to the bush in the foreground.  He/she did not like that I was there for some reason.  Should have had my bigger Lens with me.   Maybe lookin’ for a mouse?

The Historic Coal Town of Pottsville is just full of old Homes that probably date back to the day’s when Coal Was King in this area.  Much of the town where people live is back on the secondary streets, and not much on Main Street.  It is also the town where Yeingling Beer is made.  This beer has been made here for over 100 yrs.  I like it, but can’t drink much of it because it always gives me a headache.  The Coal Crackers here drink it like it’s water!  They are used to it.

Thank You

LEARNING

As most of you know by now, I just love the History around my area and going to nearby Historic spots.  Yesterday, I went up to one of my favorite area’s that I used to play in while a young boy.  However, this time I went there for a Historic Walk at the Kerney to learn more about what used to be there long ago.  I found out that there is so much more to this place than what I knew.

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Here, Glenn, is telling how the old Canal Locks would work and why they did what was normal for that day and age.  Back in the day, Canal Boats were charged a fee to go thru the Lock.  The price depended on how much tonage they were hauling.  Coal, Wood, Goods, etc. were all charged.  Didn’t matter who you were.  If you look close, behind Glenn, you still can see what remains of a Lock.

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Here, our teacher, is telling of what was once here that you don’t see anymore.  Believe it or not, this area where we are standing used to be under water.  The water actually went up as high as the blue train cars to the left of the Image.  Changes in the River, over the passing years, changed all that.  When this area was dry, and the water recedid, there were some cabins built here.  If you look close while walking, there still can be seen stone foundations from those cabins of long ago.

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Our group is being told about the Covered Bridge that was once here, back in 1892.  The Stone supports still remain.

Even though the ground was a bit wet and sloppy at places from all the rain we had, I liked this Tour that was given.  I learned about things that I never knew where there and how much the area changed.  Thanks for coming along.

Thank you.

TRAILS OF HISTORY.

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This is the famous Independence Hall located in Historic Philadelphia, PA.

Inside this Historic structure is where the Declaration of Independence was signed on July 4th, 1776.

This structure is one of the most favored places to visit.  Tickets must be purchased to see the area, where the Declaration was signed, that has been restored back to it’s orginial look.  When I shot this Image it was early morning before it was open.  Not many people were here.  This was a good time to capture a Image.  By the time I was ready to leave, the area was filled with hundreds of people.  The Park Rangers are kept busy all the time.

Security around here is very tight.  Just in front of me, and out of the Image, was a fence that had a sign on it that said “No admittence without a ticket”!  You should not go beyond it, or you’ll be stopped.  No firearms.  Bags can and will be checked before entering the area.  Police are everywhere.  Security camera’s are watching every move!

One of the things I like to do, is just sit and watch people do what they do.  Sit and watch the world go by.  People are here from all over.  Different cultures and nationally come here to see this.  I have observed that most visitors obey the signs that tell what you can do and what you should not.  However, there are some who just don’t care and do what they want.  Not good, in my opinion.  Rules here are done for a reason.  People throw trash on the ground, and don’t take time to throw it into bins placed around the area.  I hate seeing that.  If caught doing so, you might be fined.

Thank you.

RETURN TO HISTORY.

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For the 1st time in a few days, we had some nice sunny weather, so I grabbed my camera gear and headed down to a favorite place in the city of Philadelphia that I like to go to.  Independence Park, the Birthplace of our Nation, has so very much to offer and see.  You can spend a whole day here going in and out of all the Historic buildings that have been preserved by the National Park Service.

This is Congress Hall.  Located in Independence Park on 6th & Market St. it served as the Seat of the US Congress from December 6th, 1790 to May 14th, 1800.  It ratified the Bill of Rights and the US Constitution in 1793.  It also oversaw the Inaugurations of our 1st President, George Washington and our 2nd President, John Adams.

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Inside Congress Hall on the 2nd Floor is where most of our Nation’s business was taken care of.  Brought back to its original look by the National Park Service, this is what it looked like in its day.  Of course, there were no electric lights at the time.  Everything was done by candle light & day light.  The carpet is not an original.  It is a reproduction of what it was.

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During my “walk about” in the Park, I came across this fella dressed in the ware of Colonial Days, playing a Mountain Dulcimer, that I have heard before.  The Mountain Dulcimer has a very soothing, interesting sound to it.  Almost sounding like a Harp, but really isn’t.  This man could play it very well.  He made it look so easy to do.  The music that came out of this instrument was so pleasant to listen to.  I watched & listened to him play for about 15 min.  Then asked him if I could take his Image.  I thanked him and moved on.

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This is just a part of Independence Park.  Here you’re looking down the open area with the Visitor Center on the right and Independence Hall in the center.  The Visitor Center is where the original Liberty Bell is located, but I didn’t go in there.  Just too many people!

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Located right next to Independence Hall is the Congress Library that is now a gift store.

I enjoyed my 2nd visit here.  There is much to see.  Lot’s of walking.  In fact, I walked around so much that my legs started getting sore & stiff.  I then returned to my car for the return drive home.

Thank you.

ON THE TRAIL OF HISTORY

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Located in Lebanon County, the Cornwall Iron Furnace was built in 1742 and stayed in operation until 1883.  Now a museum for everyone to Tour and see how Iron was made long ago.

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Called a Abattoir, this Gothic Revival structure served as a smoke house and butcher shop for the Cornwall Iron Estate.

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This was the Iron Masters home.  Now used as apartments.

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In 1875 this was the Paymasters Office for the Iron Furnace.  Now used as a Art Studio.

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The Manager’s Office & Home.  The Furnace Manager was ranked 2nd in command to the Owner.  After 1916, Bethlehem Steel also used this building as it’s Cornwall Office.

Thank you.

THEN & NOW

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Hello there, my followers.  In relation to my last Post on Port Clinton Ave. I had stated that I’d go back up there and try to shoot a Image like the one above on how it looks today.  Well, I did do just that, but found that this Image would have been impossible to re-shoot.  The place where this was taken is so very over-grown with trees that their was no way to get it.  So, I did the next best thing.  The Images below are from where the Red Dot’s are placed.  It is way different than 200 yrs. ago.

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This is what the TowPath looks like today, with the old Canal off to the left and the River to the right.

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Looking into the old Lock #30.  Summer is a bad time to see what remains, because it get’s so over-grown.  Winter time is better.

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This is the modern day Image of Port Clinton Ave.  The Lock & Canal are off to the left.  The road is almost the same as it was.  Just macadam, now, and not a dirt road.

As always,

Thank you.

HISTORIC WAGON

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This past Sunday, I made another trip back up to Hamburg to see if the Historical Society was open this time.  Before I had stopped by and it was closed, but it stated that it was open every Sunday from 1 – 4 pm.  Why no one was there, I didn’t know at the time.

So, this time it was open, which made me happy.  Didn’t want to go there again and find it closed.  Grabbing my camera I went inside and was very cheerfully greeted by 2 people.  Found out they were the owners of the Society.  Very nice people to talk with.  I had told them about my younger day’s growing up in Hamburg and what I had remembered from long ago.  I also mentioned to them that most of my Family was from Hamburg and they all served in the Armed Forces during WWII.  The conversation then went on to all the places I knew but were not there anymore.  The old Union Canal, Berkey Underwear, Haun Motors, etc.  They stated to me that they had a old original “Husker Wagon” that was housed in a separate building.  Humm  .  .  .  that’s interesting.  I asked if I could see it.  My wish was granted.

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With my camera in tow, I was led into a very small building.  There in front of me was what I saw with the camera.  This old “Huskster Wagon” dates back to around 1903, when it was pulled along in the streets of Hamburg selling produce of all kinds.  This was long before refrigeration and ways of keeping food cold.  Pulled along by 2 Horses, the Huskster would travel the streets all day long until most of his merchandise was sold.

The paint has faded over time and the wooden wheels are in need of repair.  Notice the long handle brake to keep the wagon from drifting.  The Historical Society would like to restore this Historic piece of History, but money is hard to come by since most of it comes from donations.

It would be nice to once again see History in the streets again from long ago.

Thank You.