OUT THERE!

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Life here is pretty much back to normal now.  Eileen’s knee is doing much better now.  No longer do I have to stay around the house to help her in moving around.  She walks, goes up & down steps, and is doing the normal things around the house that was done before.  Her incision has healed quite well.  Soon you won’t be able to tell that she had knee surgery at all!

Now, I can go and come much as I did before.  Getting “out there” with my camera gear is back to normal.  Above is the old Union Canal Towpath in High Definition.  Using my Pentax K10d, I took 5 different shot’s.  Each one was 2 f/stops lower, then 1 normal, then 2 f/stops higher.  They were then blended together, that is always done with HD.

Now, I’m not so sure if I really need 5 different images like that.  I’m thinking that I could just use 3.  Would it be better that way or not.

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During the Summer months, the old Union Canal Lock get’s so very over-grown with trees, weeds, & alge in the water that it’s hard to tell what was once there.  The Winter is a better time.

Thanks for stopping by.

Les

 

RETURN TO BETHELHEM STEEL

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I tend to enjoy going back to this very historic area just because so much has happened here from years gone bye.  Bethelhem Steel was once the largest Steel producers on the East Coast.  However, due to corporate greed over time and compitation from foreign steel producers, the place just did not keep up with the changing market.  Years ago, the once mighty steel producer, stopped it’s production never to make steel again.  Today, the place is a Historic reminder of what used to be.  The buildings that are still standing retain the color from the blast furnace’s that once roared here.  Some of the buildings have been torn down, but many still stand.

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Here looking down one of the area’s, are buildings that still remain.  On the right is what used to be Machine Shop #2 where gun barrels for battleships were turned on huge lathe’s that are no longer there.  These lathe’s were so big that the operator could sit on the carriage while turning the barrel.  Would have loved to see that.  On the left is the Blower Room that once supplied air to the Mill.  In the distance is the Crane Repair Building where huge Cranes lifted gun barrels onto waiting flat bed cars.

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A Plaque showing the ships that were made from the Steel Plant.

Thanks for reading.

Les

ODDS & ENDS

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While crusin’ the Internet, I happen to come across this Image of my ole’ Destroyer, the USS Carpenter DD-825, that was taken in San Francisco Bay.  I was not aboard her at this time.  Was long gone.  Here she looks pretty good, because I’ve enhanced the Image a bit.

In Her later years, she was sold to the Turkish Navy, and re-named but I don’t know what.  She lasted for some years, and then was sold for scrap.  I have many memories of this ole’ “Tin Can.”  This was my Home for 2.5 yrs.  It’s where I got my “sea legs”.  Where for the 1st time at Sea, I was so sea sick that I could not even keep a cracker in my stomach!  I found out what a “sea bat” was.  Learned what it was like to get “fired upon” over in Nam.  Scared the crap out of me!  Much more.

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Ok.  A change of subject.  For the past few weeks I have taken a good interest on doing more of B&W photography.  I’m getting better with it using my Nikon D7000 camera and the software I have to enhance my Images.  I’ve been doing some reading on what settings work when doing B&W and so far they work well.  This one was taken out on the back roads in Hamburg, PA.  I’ve read to use a ISO of 100, a f/stop setting of f/8 at 1/100 of a sec.  Not bad.  I’ll keep going.

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This shot was taken at one of my favorite places I go from time to time.  This “pond” was never here years ago.  It has formed from a depression in the Coal scrap from rain, and snow over the years.  It’s getting some Lilly Pads, and I could hear the “peepers” making their usual song.  Strange how Nature changes the landscape.

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Here is another “muddy” depression that has formed.  The “peepers” are here also.  Too darn muddy to walk down there.  Notice the Coal piles that this place is made of.

That’s it.

Thanks for stopping by.

Les

TOWER HOTEL

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Once located on top of Skyline Drive here in Reading, the Tower House was another popular attraction for the Reading area.  Built in1890, it stood just a short distance away from the Summit Hotel.  Here you can see the old Summit Hotel in the distance, with the Railroad that led up to them both.  The Tower Hotel was also destroyed by Arson fire on April 24, 1923.  What is strange about this is the Summit House was destroyed by fire just one day before!  I’m sure that Arsonists set fire to both of them, but why remains a mystery to this day.  They were never caught.

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Built on the old foundation of the Tower Hotel now stands the Mt. Penn Fire Tower that was built in 1932.  The Fire Tower was used as a look-out for mountain fires that surround the area.  The orginial road is still used to this day.

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The Fire Tower as it is today.  The City does not take much care of this structure any longer.  It used to be open to climb the steps to see the City of Reading, but now is closed because of being un-safe.  The lights on it don’t work anymore, and the Dome is falling apart.  The windows are broken and have never been replaced.  It’s used as a radio, cell phone transmitter at this time.

Again, it’s a sorry thing to see that so much History here in my City is going to waste.  As with much of the History here, it also will fall apart.

Thanks for reading.

Les

SUMMIT HOUSE

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The Summit House was once located at the top of Skyline Drive here in Reading, PA.  It was a popular place for people from the City to escape the busy streets of Reading for a week-end or just a few day’s.  The House had rooms, a bar, billard hall, dance hall, and many activities for young and old.  Today, there is not much left of the ole’ place.  On April 23, 1923 it was set on fire by a Arson that was never found.  Image shown was from a Postcard.

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What remains of the Stone steps that led up to the House.  Steps that lead to History.

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Another view of the old steps that still exist today.

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This was once a railroad bed that came right below the Summit House.  People could ride the Train up to the House, and take the steps that I showed above.  The rails & wooden ties have long been torn away.  It’s used as a Walking Trail now.

There is not very much to show of the old place.  The foundation of where it once stood is still there, but in poor condition.  The City of Reading does not take much care of this Historic spot.  It just waste’s away into History.

Thank you for stopping by.

Les

BUNG-HOLE

 Greetings to my NEW readers that I have aquired in the past few day’s.  I appreciate you following what I Post.  Thank you!

Now, on to something else.

In your many conversations with other people you know, have you ever heard the word “Bung-Hole”?  No, it’s not what you might think on the human body!

The word “Bung-Hole” comes from the day’s of Proabition way back in the 1920’s and 1930’s.  Back then beer was made and stored in wooden barrels that were hand made.  It was then used by illegal Rum-runners that would sell them to “speak easy’s” where ever it was needed.

After making a barrel to pour beer into, they had to have a “hole” to get the beer into.  A hole was bored into the barrel and beer was poured into the barrel.  Now, there had to be a plug to keep the beer from spilling out.  The plug was called a “Bung”.  Thus the name and how it came to be.

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How bout’ that!

Thanks for stopping by.

Les

HISTORIC HOMES IN READING, PA

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The City of Reading, PA where I live on the outskirts, is full of Historic Homes that date back to the 1800s.  This is just one of them.

This is the Wilhelm Mansion that was built in 1877 by Charles W. Wilhelm & his Wife, Sarah.  Mr. Wilhelm lived here from 1877-1936.  There is also a Carriage House in the back, that was added in 1890, which I could not get to.  The Mansion is built in the Gothic Style.  It’s located on Center Ave. in the Historic District of Reading.  Is listed on the National Register of Historic Places.

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This is just part of what is in the Mansion.  Not my Image.

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This is just one of the ornate ceilings in the Mansion.

When I took the Image outside, the Mansion was not open for visitor Tours during the Winter.  I would just love to see this Mansion inside, but not until Spring.

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This is the same place, but I’ve messed with it using Lightroom CC.  Sort of makes it look a bit “spooky”?

Thanks for visiting again.

Les