Hello there to all my Followers.  Do some of you remember this?  Maybe some of you don’t.  This is the Historic Wurlitzer Juke Box that was built in the 1940’s.  I can’t remember who designed the original ones like this, but most of it was made of glass because the plastic was not very available during the War years.

It had a distinctive color pattern that was bright and cheerful.  It also had the world famous bubbles that traveled around on the inside of the glass.  This player would play songs from the Rock & Roll years of the 50’s & 60’s.  1 play was a nickel, and 6 plays were a quarter!  Dancing to your favorite songs was a common thing back in my day.

Most of the songs that were on the Top Record Charts were here to play.  Artists such as Bill Hayley & The Comets, Elvis, Jimmy Dean, Roy Oberson,  Little Richard, were all there.  Drop a nickel in the machine, press the letter & number of the song, and it would play your choice in order that it was received.  “Put another Dime in the Jukebox” and the music would never stop.

I remember these Players well.  I’m sorry to see that they have gone into History, but some of them are still around.  The original ones are few and far between.  Collectors have them.  If you want an original player you will pay a hefty price!


As time went by, the Wurlitzer Company made a newer model, like the one shown above.  It worked the same as the older one, but with no bubbles and the price to play went up, of course.  I think this one was 1 play for a dime, and 4 plays for a quarter.  Not sure on that one.  Both players had great sound for it’s day.



Some of you may recall that I do have a small collection of 1:18 scale models of Classic Cars of the 50’s & 60’s.  This is just one of them.

Built-in 1957 by the Ford Motor Company, the Ford Skyliner was one of the first cars that came out with a retractable roof that folded back into the trunk of the car.  By releasing 2 small clamps inside the passenger compartment, the owner could press a button and the roof would retract & fold into the truck.  It was a nice idea, but it ended up creating problems.

There were many troubles with the roof not folding back correctly, and the owner did not have any trunk space.  On top of this was the roof would leak water when it rained because it didn’t seal right.


In 1958, Ford Motor Company came out with almost the same thing, but a slightly different style.  Named the 1958 Ford Fairlane Skyliner it stayed into production until 1959, when then it was discontinued.  The Car still remains as one of Fords Classic Cars.


I’m over at this place again, yesterday, because I wanted to get “out there” and do some shooting with my camera.  I seem to be drawn here to the Grings Mill area many times hoping that I’ll find something different.  Usually most all of it remains the same, except when the Seasons start changing.  Soon the leaves will change color and Fall will be here.  It is one of my favorite times of the year.  Water here is a bit on the high side because of the rain we’ve had before.  It’s usually not this high.


At the far end of the bridge that cross’s over the Schyukill River is this old Pump House.  The Pump House dates back to the middle 1800’s and was used, at one time, to pump water from the river into the Union Canal that once was here.  It stayed in operation until the Union Canal was no longer needed.  The Pumps that were here have been removed.  They are no longer needed. Now, the old house serves as a storage area for the Park Service.


It was such a nice beautiful, somewhat cool day, that I could not resist pressing the shutter button once more.

Images taken with my Pentax K10D using a Tamron 17-50mm AF Lens.



“Out There” again, cruising the back country roads with my camera looking for Historic buildings that are all over my area, I came across the old Dreibelbis Grist Mill that was built in 1854.  This Mill once supplied Corn Meal & Flour to the area’s near-by.  It stayed in operation until 1984 until it got to expensive to operate by today’s standards.  The original machinery is still inside.


Behind the 2 story Mill is where the water entered the building to drive the Water Wheel that powered the machinery to make flour & Corn Meal.  If you look at the bottom near the center you see a round opening.  This is where water entered from a Mill Pond.  Now, almost covered over it’s hard to see what it once was.


Located just behind the Mill here is what remains of the Mill Pond that stored water for the Wheel.  You can always tell just where the Pond was because it always leaves a sign in the shape of a round circle or square.  Mill Ponds like this were supplied with a steady water supply from a near-by creek or river.  In this case, the water entered the Pond in the rear.  The Stone in the foreground is where the water entered the Mill.


Hidden by growth of weeds, this is where water entered the Mill.  Known as a Mill Race.  It got it’s name from the water “racing” into the Mill.  Thus the name.  There is no water here anymore.


Back in the early day’s there was no fancy machinery to lift goods in and out of the Mill.  Everything had to be done by hand or use a 2-block hoist.  Located at the top is where a Hoist was installed to do the lifting.  The 2-block Hoist was made of wood & had hemp rope for the pulley’s.  This is the reason for the small roof at the top to keep it covered.


The Old Mill from a different view.  The electric that you see did not exist back then.  All of that was installed later on when a electric generator supplied power to the Mill, thus ending the Water Wheel.

Most all of the Mills around my area are just like this one.  Some are smaller.  Some are bigger.  All of them were powered in the same way with water!  There were quite a few of them.  Some are gone to History.  Other’s remain to this day.




Yesterday, I took my Wife up to her old home in Minersville, PA to meet with some of her long time girl friends that she has known since High School.  They were going to have some lunch together at the old Washington House.  So, after I dropped her off, I had a few hours to spend just “snooping around” the area with my Pentax.

Located just outside Minersville on the road to Dunncock is this left over Coal Chute that was once used to load Coal into waiting trucks to be taken where-ever needed when Coal Was King in this area.  Located just behind the shed is a rusty old conveyor that was used to move the coal from one place to another.  You can barely see it because of all the over-growth.  I was not going to climb up there just to get a shot of it.  I’m surprised that the old thing is still standing.  It’s just wasting away into the past.

Like I had stated before, the Coal Region Area is just full of History.  The only problem is knowing where to find what remains.  I’m slowly doing this.