ON HALLOWED GROUND.3

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Over 150 yrs. ago, this field was full of dead & wounded Soldiers from both sides of the Civil War.  There is a sign behind me that said “No Relic Hunting.”

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Fences of the Battlefield.  For this shot, I had to “sneak in” on a dirt road that normal traffic was not allowed by the Park Service.  Didn’t get caught!  Whew!

While I was down here in Gettysburg, I spent a good 5 hrs. here driving around.  Even though snooping around I still missed some key area’s.  Eisenhower Farm is one of them.  I had only allowed myself so much time, because it is a long drive home.  Maybe next time.

 

I will try and make this one the last Post on Gettysburg.  My next stop will be to Antietam National Battlefield Park in MD.

Thanks so much for all your likes.

ON HALLOWED GROUND.2

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This is a cement monument to the 90th Pennsylvania Regiment that was in action here on the morning of July 1st, 1863.

During the fight on the 1st day, this area was once a wooded section.  Most of the trees were blown away from musket & cannon fire.  When I looked more closely at the “tree” there was a musket, a nap sac, a rifle, and a canteen that was hung here by a Soldier from the 90th Pennsylvania during a lull in the action.  He sat here to take a short rest from death & fighting that was just below him.

There is also a bird nest at the very top, and a cannon ball that split the tree.  The bird nest is supposed to show that Life will go on, despite what happened here.  I don’t know if it was the original ball that shattered this tree.  Probably not.

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A 10 lb. Parrot Cannon used by both Union & Confederate Forces at the Battle of Gettysburg.

 

Thank you.

ON HALLOWED GROUND.1

THE STORY OF IVERSON’S PITS.

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On July 1, 1863, the men of Alfred Iverson’s North Carolina Brigade had arrived at Gettysburg and were preparing to outflank the Union First Corps at Oak Hill. This spot was the northernmost point of Seminary Ridge. They were formed into their line of battle and advanced towards a line of trees about 300 yds. away. The Brigade was made up of the 5th, 12th, 20th, and 23rd North Carolina Infantries. To their left front was a low stone wall but they paid it no mind, they were confident in their success. They believed that they were about to crash through the woods and roll up the flank of the Yankees on the other side.

Suddenly, a vast sheet of flame erupted from the stone wall. Some Federal soldiers,who were crouched down behind the wall, could not believe their good fortune at having an entire Confederate Brigade served up to them on a platter, so they burst over the top of the wall and let loose a withering volley at the unsuspecting rebels. Unfortunately for the Confederates, Iverson, their commander, had not deployed an advance line of skirmishers in order to prevent any surprises. Hundreds of North Carolinian fell in straight lines just as they had marched. In the days after the battle, they were buried in an unmarked mass grave, virtually in the same spots where they fell. For years after, the farmer who owned ” Iverson’s Pits ” claimed that his wheat grew the tallest in that part of his field.

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This is what IVERSON’S PITS looks like today.  The Stone Wall is gone, but if you look close to the left bottom of my Image, you can still make out the depression.

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This is looking what is the rest of the field that was off to my right.  Much to my surprise, there is only 1 small Monument to mark the spot where all these Confederate men died.  Also, there is nothing on the Map to show where this is.  It was a bit hard to find.  There was also nothing along the Main Tour Road to show this spot.  Wondering why?

There is also something else that I found out about.  It is told that this place is Haunted by the Spirits from the past.  Strange noise’s, yelling, and what sounds like gun fire have been known to be heard at night.  Makes me wonder, since I do believe that Spirits & Ghosts, if all that is true.  While walking in this area, I never heard anything except the wind and birds chirping.  In my future Posts about “On Hallowed Ground” there are other documented Haunting s at other places.  There is nothing here to show what horrible action took place here so long ago.

Thank you.

UNION CANAL

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Hello there!  Sorry that I’ve been away from WP for awhile, but had another problem.  This time it was with WordPress!  For some reason, WP wanted me to start paying for my Site!  I’ve never done that before in all the time I’ve had this account!  Why?  Made me on the cranky side.  Contacted WP and was told to down-load the new WP Site.  The site was in a Zip File and I hate those things.  I always mess them up and then can’t find what I did!  So, to make a long story short, I then tried using Internet Explorer.  Had to sign back into everything!  Now, I’m hoping that this will keep working good like it is so far.

Ok.  I’m back to normal as before.  The above Image is one that I took of the Towpath alongside the old Union Canal.  It’s in HD.  I go to this place quite often.  It seems that it’s a magnet for me.  Always looking for something a bit different.  With this one I liked the path stretching into the trees with the shadows.

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For this one I tried something different.  I had purchased a small Tripod that will get low on a subject.  Like ground level.  A different perspective you could call it.  I had to get down on all 4’s to take this shot.  The problem with doing this is that when I have to get that low, I have a bit of trouble getting back up on my 2 legs!  The ole’ legs don’t work as well as they used to!  Not happy about it, but not much I can do right now.  Just have to be careful!

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While walking along the Path, I noticed these Blue Bells growing alongside the old Canal.  For some reason, there are not many flowers like this to be seen.  Why, I have no idea.  Had to shoot this from a low position to get a nice shot of them.  Got back up again after about 5 min. of trying!

Thank you!

THE GARMENT INDUSTRY

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As I had mentioned in my last Post, I stated that there would be more coming later.  During the 1930’s, 40’s, and 50’s the making of Ladies Laungire was a huge business here in Reading, PA.  One of the biggest makers of Laungire was the Berkshire Knitting Mills or also called The Textile Machine Works.  For many years this complex made garments of all kinds to be shipped all over the USA.  More than 1000 employees worked here on all shifts.  It was a 24 – 7 operation.  This complex had its own dye building, a barber shop, lunch cafeteria, and power building that supplied the power needed to run all the knitting machines.  I have never seen this complex in its heyday, but I can only Imagine what it used to be.

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Taken from the Textile Machine Works web-site, this is just how big it used to be.

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This is looking at part of the old complex.  The Power building is off to the right of the Image.

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Here I’m trying to show just how big this place is.  During its operation, there were windows where you see the white portions of the building.  All 4 floors were in production with Knitting Machines that needed constant attention.

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The inside of one of the buildings during its day’s of manufacture.

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Another one of the different buildings in the complex.

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This is looking down the long rows of support poles that were there when the Knitting Machines were running.  If you look at one of my above Images, you can still see those same support poles.  These are looking fancier than before.  You almost can still hear the noise of machinery from long ago.

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Here’s another looking the other way.  The thing about these 2 Images, is that I had to “sneak in” the building and shoot the camera.  There were signs pasted on the windows & doors “No Entry Authorized Entry Only”  Oops!  Thought I’d take a chance and see what happens!  No one was looking!  So in I went.

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After the Textile Machine Works went out of business in the 70’s, it was converted over to a Factory Outlet Store where people could buy all kinds of different clothes at a much cheaper price.  It was in business for many years until it also failed.  Why this was, I don’t know.  The Stores that occupied the buildings were from all the different big name products.  Now, the present day all the buildings are being converted over to Luxury Apartments.  Just how fancy, remains to be seen.

POP OUTS

A few weeks ago, I happen to be viewing a Post made by one of the people that I follow here on WordPress.  JourneyswithJohnbo is one of the Photographers on WP that I have been following for a number of months now.  He takes some really nice Images of places that I’ve never been too, and probably never will.  Anyway, in one of his Images, he had Posted an interesting Image that seem’d to “Pop Out” at you, thus creating a different look.  This gave me some interest, so I asked him just how that is done.  He told me and with that, I went on my own to try this new type of thing for myself.

I had to do some research on it to find out just how this is done.  Found out that you can do this effect using Photoshop CC.  Since I do have that program, I went further.  Found that I could down-load instructions for this on Photoshop Essentials.  I did this and then with much eagerness started trying to give one of my Images the same effect.

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Now, using the instructions that were given me, I followed them step by step until the end.  It didn’t come out right!  I did something wrong!  What was it?  I went back and tried again.  It still didn’t come out right!  What the heck am I doing wrong, I thought.  So, I had to let it sit for awhile so I could think about it.  So, to make a long story shorter, I kept trying until I finally figured out what was wrong.  It took me awhile!  The above Image is my first one done the way I had wanted.  The Image seem’s to “Pop Out” from the rest of the shot.  It is of the building that General George Washington’s Officers stayed in during the Winter of 1777 at Valley Forge, PA.

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Well now, here is another one that is an oldie but goodie.  It’s an abandoned home in Shenandoah, PA.  I wanted to make the Main Home “Pop Out” from the rest of the Image.  I sorta messed up the very bottom of the Image, because this is only the 2nd time I’ve done this.  In the future, I’m going to try other Images I have and see how they come out.  I’ll also try and make them bigger.